This site requires that you enable Javascript to function properly Highlights from Scholten Japanese Art | Japanese Printmaking | Kiyonobu, Utamaro, Toyokuni, Hokusai, Hashiguchi Goyo, Kawase Hasui
Scholten Japanese Art Gallery
Highlights from Scholten Japanese Art
March 15 — Apri1 2, 2003

This spring, Scholten Japanese Art proudly presents Highlights from Scholten Japanese Art, a collection of Japanese works of art, including folding screens, paintings, woodblock prints, lacquer, netsuke and inro. The works selected for this exhibition reflect some of the finest objects from our collection and mark the last show in our 66th street townhouse location. As of May 1, Scholten Japanese Art will be opening new doors at 145 West 58th Street.

The works of art represented in our Highlights show, are largely a reflection of the Edo period (1603-1868). One invaluable record of early 17th century sensibilities, can be seen in the Matabei school screen of Okuni Kabuki. The screen depicts a lively scene in the entertainment district of Kyoto against a gold leaf ground and illustrates the intersection where everyday life in early 17th century Japan meets the ‘floating world’ offering its retreat from the realities of life.

pink fujiOther enticing views of the ‘floating world’ courtesans and dandies can be seen in the masterful prints on exhibit by Torii Kiyonobu (ca. 1664-1729) Kitagawa Utamaro (1753-1806) and Utagawa Toyokuni I (1769-1825). Another print master, Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849), shows us the mythical power of Japan’s ominous mountain in his Pink Fuji, while Hashiguchi Goyo (1880-1921) and Kawase Hasui (1883-1957) bring us back to modern day with their updated ‘new’ style of shin hanga woodblock prints.

woman after bath Not to be missed either is the fantastic collection of inro (seal cases), netsuke (toggles used to anchor objects), and lacquer objects. A stunning example of lacquer work on exhibition is the Koami school 19th century tiered box of surimono form illustrating a hawk felling a crane. This tour-de-force utilizes nearly the entire range of a lacquer artist’s techniques and was most likely done by three different artisans; a specialist in makie-e, somada (mother-of pearl) inlays, and metalwork.

netsuke The exhibition opens March 15, 2003 and continues through April 2, 2003. Scholten Japanese Art is open Tuesday through Saturday 11am to 5pm, by appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 212.585.0474.