This site requires that you enable Javascript to function properly Scholten Japanese Art | Woodblock Prints | Tsukioka Yoshitoshi no. 94, Cherry trees blossom by the Sumida river, boats fade from view in the gathering dusk, at Sekiya as I view the moon -Mizuki Tatsunosuke
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Yoshitoshi
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, 1839-1892
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: no. 94, Cherry trees blossom by the Sumida river, boats fade from view in the gathering dusk, at Sekiya as I view the moon -Mizuki Tatsunosuke
(Tsuki hyakushi: sakura saku, Sumida no kawa ni, uku fune mo, kurete Sekiya ni, tsuki o koso mire -Mizuki Tatsunosuke)

signed Yoshitoshi with artist's seal Taiso, engraver's mark Chokuzan, and published by Akiyama Buemon, ca. 1891
oban tate-e 13 7/8 by 9 1/2 in., 35.2 by 24.1 cm
Mizuki Tatsunosuke (1673-1745) was a famous Kabuki actor of the Ichimura Theater. From the mid-17th century, Kabuki productions featured all-male casts and actors specializing in female roles became identified as onnagata. Onnagata dressed androgynously and were marked by their shaved foreheads covered in purple scarves. Tatsunosuke, one such onnagata, can be seen here with the purple scarf in front and a combination of male topknot and loose hair in back. He wears a colorful robe with long sleeves, a girlish style which was popular with wakashu (male prostitutes). Onnagata achieved huge popularity and were understood to represent the purest form of femininity, more so than women.
Tatsunosuke was remembered for dance performances with seven different character and costume changes, done in rapid succession. In this composition, he has travelled up the Sumida river to view the cherry blossom at Sekiya, and composes a poem while standing amongst the blooms.
Reference:
John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, 2001, cat. no. 94
price: $ 550